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Reading: Healthcare Students’ Perceptions, Attitudes, and Beliefs on Professional Identity and Interp...

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Original Theory & Research

Healthcare Students’ Perceptions, Attitudes, and Beliefs on Professional Identity and Interprofessional Socialization After a Single Event Co-treatment Simulation

Authors:

Lindsay A. Perry ,

University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences, US
About Lindsay
Lindsay Perry, PT, DPT is board-certified in neurologic physical therapy and an Assistant Professor at the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences. She has 12 years of experience treating patients with various neurologic conditions, research involving walking recovery, and implementing the use of innovative teaching methods in higher education for entry-level healthcare students.
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Catherine M. Andrea,

University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences, US
About Catherine
Catherine M. Andrea, PT, MPT is an Assistant Professor at the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences. She specializes in working with the pediatric and neurologic populations and is pursuing her Doctor of Education degree.
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Kelly Layne,

University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences, US
About Kelly
Kelly Layne, OTD, OTR/L is an Assistant Professor at the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences with a background in higher education, online education, and working with adults with orthopedic and neurological conditions.
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Kayla Collins

University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences, US
About Kayla
Kayla Collins, EdD, OTR/L is an Assistant Professor at the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences with a background in higher education, online education, and working with the geriatric population.
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Abstract

INTRODUCTION Readying healthcare students for interprofessional care is an essential responsibility of higher education institutions that can be accomplished using simulation.  The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes of student values, beliefs, and attitudes related to their professional identity and interprofessional socialization in entry-level occupational and physical therapy students. METHODS Forty-one healthcare professional students, 23 physical therapy and 18 occupational therapy, mean age 24.73 (± 2.07), participated in a simulation-enhanced interprofessional co-treatment experience using a pre-post study design.  Surveys were completed before and after the simulation. RESULTS Paired t-tests revealed statistically significant differences between the pre- and post-test scores of the Interprofessional Socialization and Values Scale (p ≤ 0.001) and the Professional Identity Values Scale- Professional Development (≤ 0.001). Between group comparisons by program revealed no statistically significant difference at baseline or at post-testing for the Interprofessional Socialization and Values Scale (p = 0.145). DISCUSSION The results suggest participation in a simulation-enhanced interprofessional co-treatment experience promoted positive changes in perceptions of professional identity measured by the Professional Identity Values Scale- Professional Development and interprofessional socialization measured by the Interprofessional Socialization and Values Scale. These measures may be useful for obtaining quantifiable data to track learning outcomes in entry-level physical and occupational therapy students. CONCLUSION Entry-level healthcare student impressions regarding professional identity and interprofessional collaboration are essential for successful clinical internship experiences and safe patient care. To quantify long-term learning outcomes, further research is needed related to carryover after interprofessional simulation experiences within a variety of entry-level healthcare professions.
How to Cite: Perry, L.A., Andrea, C.M., Layne, K. and Collins, K., 2021. Healthcare Students’ Perceptions, Attitudes, and Beliefs on Professional Identity and Interprofessional Socialization After a Single Event Co-treatment Simulation. Health, Interprofessional Practice and Education, 4(2), p.eP2134. DOI: http://doi.org/10.7710/2641-1148.2134
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Published on 08 Mar 2021.
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